Category Archives: Home Economics

Makin’ Bacon

One of the more worthwhile foods to produce at home is bacon. It is also somewhat fun. However, to make bacon, you’re going to need a pig. We don’t raise pigs, at least not yet. Being an animal that one … Continue reading

Posted in Ducks, Food, Home Economics, Pigs | 1 Comment

Kefir Cheese Mega Fail

Back in the spring I was exuberant after reading The Art of Natural Cheesemaking by David Asher. This sounded great! Finally, a way to make good cheese without being shackled to mail-order companies for the cultures. And the promise of … Continue reading

Posted in Dairy Cattle, Food, Home Economics | 1 Comment

Milking a “family cow”

Since neither of the two books on keeping a family cow have much information about ACTUALLY miking a cow, I will show and tell you how we do it. I will NOT trouble you with the matter of hand milking … Continue reading

Posted in Dairy Cattle, Food, Home Economics | Leave a comment

Clothes dryer

I really find it funny how the marketing folks at appliance companies think. I am seeing now “eco” branding appearing on clothes dryers, both gas and electric. How absurd. These contrivances can neither be ecological nor economic. Unless you live … Continue reading

Posted in Dairy Cattle, Home Economics, Weather | Leave a comment

What I Mean About Worthwhile Grains

For honest reasons, I suspect, many homesteader type folks like to grow grains. This desire dovetails with the “prepper” mindset as well. And I’ve struggled with it. But we must allow our rational side inform us here, at least partly. … Continue reading

Posted in Food, Gardening, Home Economics | Leave a comment

Pear Pickin’

Perhaps the only good idea the previous owners of our farm had was to plant five pear trees, which we think are Bartletts, the kind found at Tractor Supply/Homedepot for $20 each. Pears seem to me to be even hardier … Continue reading

Posted in Food, Gardening, Home Economics | Leave a comment

Splittin’ Wood

We partially heat our home with wood, which we burn in a non-Catalytic EPA-rated woodstove. It claims to put out about 50,000 BTUs. Let’s just say it produces enough heat to warm our ~2000 SQFT 150+ year old brick farmhouse … Continue reading

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